Candid Answers To Frequently Asked Questions Post-Crash

After a crash, many victims are at a loss as to what to do. You do not want to make any mistakes, but you fear that inaction may prevent you from receiving fair compensation.

At Ellis Law Offices, we want to empower you to make the decisions that are in your best interests. Here are answers to the most commonly asked questions our attorneys receive.

What Should I Do After An Accident?

Knowing what to do in the hours and days following a crash can be necessary to preserve your claim.

Steps to take after a crash include:

  • Contacting the police and filing a report
  • Seeking medical attention
  • Documenting property damage and injuries
  • Not admitting fault
  • Contacting a lawyer

Remember — anything you say or do at an accident scene can be used to deny you benefits. In addition, failing to promptly seek medical attention can be a deciding factor in the success of your case.

Should I Speak To The Other Driver's Insurance Company?

You have little to gain by speaking to the other driver's insurer. During the insurance company's investigation, you will be contacted by an adjuster and asked to make a statement. While this may appear to be harmless at first, the adjuster is really looking for you to make an incriminating statement and admit fault. If you are contacted by an adjuster, do not make a statement and call our office right away.

Who Will Pay My Medical Expenses?

Massachusetts is a no-fault state. No-fault means that your car insurance company will pay up to $8,000 of your medical expenses. This is also true if you were a passenger.

If additional coverage was purchased (often referred to as medical payments or med pay), then there may be coverage above this $8,000. The amount of med pay coverage depends on the amount purchased for this optional insurance.

If you are uninsured, your medical bills may be paid by the insurance company of a relative, the vehicle's owner or the driver of the vehicle. Our lawyers can help you determine who is responsible for your medical bills at a case evaluation.

What Is The Statute Of Limitations To File A Lawsuit?

You are limited in the time you have to file a personal injury lawsuit. In Massachusetts, the statute of limitations is three years from the date of injury.

Additionally, if you have been injured by a defendant driver who is a public employee or an employee of a state agency, there may be a presentment requirement. This requires the claim to be presented in writing to various state entities, agencies or personnel within two years.

It is critical to contact us as soon as possible to ensure that filing deadlines are met and your case can be pursued.

Get Answers To Your Questions Today And Call Our Office

We know how confusing the process can be. With over 100 years' combined experience, we have the knowledge and resources to answer your questions with ease.

Schedule a free, no-obligation consultation and call 508-762-4334 or request an appointment online. Our offices are in Worcester and Fitchburg, but we offer at-home and hospital bed visits for your convenience. Se habla español. Tiếng Việt. ΜΗΛΑΜΕ ΕΛΛΗΝΗΚΑ.